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  #21  
Old 01-07-2011, 09:04 PM
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archangel archangel is offline
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Thank you Lombard, I have been chasing the name of the Sisters for quite some time. You have given me a great lead.

Archangel.

Ps, I found this.


There is another Nursing Order in Dublin which is not so
^well known as it ought to be—namely, the Little Sisters of
the Assumption, in Camden Street. My reason for mentioning
it is because I think its methods of visitation and attendance
on the poor might be copied in any large scheme for
the nursing of the poor in their own homes. Where the
mother of a family is sick, the Sister comes in the morning
and gets the children ready for school, gets their breakfast,
and then attends to the patient and the home. When these
matters are finished, she gets things ready for the children's
dinner, and goes home to her convent for her own meal.
She is back before the children are home from school. They
are fed, the patient is attended to, and the husband's supper
left ready for him on his return from work. The Sister then
returns to her convent after a good day's work well done.
The importance of this class of nursing is that it combines
the housekeeper with the nurse, and is eminently suited for
tlio poor in cases where the mother is ill.

Last edited by archangel; 01-07-2011 at 09:33 PM.
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  #22  
Old 31-03-2012, 09:59 PM
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That photo of The Falcon (posted above by DAMNTHEWEATHER) was taken by me back in the sixties. My parents used to drink there in the early 60s, til my father died in '64. They used to meet up with a chap called Jack, ex-British soldier back from Malaya, and his wife, who lived in Emor St. Jack had a lovely baby girl who was only 3 when the mother died.

For years our family and gang drank in Gleeson's (run by Tom Tavey, the former manager of the Charlotte in Charlotte St), which was a great pub. This closed and was demolished around 1998 and we moved to the Bleeding Horse, but this turned out to be a bit loud for our activities so the gang became scattered between Cassidy's, Devitt's and a skew of pubs in Rathmines.
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  #23  
Old 31-03-2012, 10:15 PM
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An incident in Camden street in 1920 was the cause of the largest raid ever carried out by British troops in Dublin. This was due to the shooting on 14 April of Detective Constable Harry Kells, of the DMP G Division, in Camden St. He was rushed to the Meath Hospital where he died. Harry Kells lived at 7 Pleasants St. and had been carrying out identity parades among the many republican inmates in Mountjoy Prison.

It was in this assignment that he came to the attention of Michael Collins, Director of Intelligence for the Irish Volunteers. Peadar Clancy, Vice Commandant of the Dublin Brigade of the Volunteers, then interned in Mountjoy Prison, sent word to Collins that Kells was carrying out identity parades at the “Joy” trying to find out who had executed Alan Bell on 25 March 1920. Bell, a former Resident Magistrate, was working for Dublin Castle on a strategy aimed at crippling Sinn Fein. He was questioning bank officials in an attempt to discover where Sinn Fein’s funds were hidden. If they could be found then the authorities would move to confiscate the more than £357,000 in National Loan money Collins had collected as Minister of Finance. Bell’s killing was a clear warning to the Castle that any effort to locate this money would be dealt with quickly and ruthlessly

In April there was a hunger strike taking place by republican prisoners in Mountjoy and tensions were very high. Two of those sought in connection with Kells' killing were Sinn Féin members Michael and William Kavanagh who lived at 5 Pleasants St., who had previously been "fingered" by Kells, and it was thought they would seek refuge among friends in the neighbourhood. The troops swarmed over Camden St from Cuffe street and into Portobello and the homes of the local Jews. Over 100 people were arrested that day but Kells' killer was not among them.
(taken from reports in the Irish Times and the New York Times, April 1920)
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2012, 12:01 AM
matesofthegarden matesofthegarden is offline
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Loving this thread,Bringing back lots of memories. Many thanks.
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Old 02-04-2012, 02:19 AM
camden camden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAMNTHEWEATHER View Post
The name changed to the FALCON,it was crap.Just found it ! My mate lived just 2 doors away from Carberry's the Cobler,who stayed there long after the top of the building was pulled down.
This street was called Old Camden Street and not Camden Row.

Camden Row is at the end of Lower Camden Street.The street starts at

Ryan's Pub and goes through to The Long Lane.There's an old graveyard

on this street where a young boy called Tommy Powell was found murdered

in the late fifties.I believe he was from the Cuffe Street area.
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  #26  
Old 02-04-2012, 02:34 AM
camden camden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archangel View Post
This derilict convent is just across the road. Was it something to do with the Poor Clares. I remember it open in the late 40s
This building was not part of the convent.It was in fact the premises of

Earley & Co.They were a family of Ecclestiastic Artists who manufactured

stained glass and carved marble.They started their business there about 1861

and closed around 1975.I remember them very well.The back lane entrance

to their premises was known around Camden Street as " Marble Lane "
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  #27  
Old 02-04-2012, 04:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camden View Post
This building was not part of the convent.It was in fact the premises of

Earley & Co.They were a family of Ecclestiastic Artists who manufactured

stained glass and carved marble.They started their business there about 1861

and closed around 1975.I remember them very well.The back lane entrance

to their premises was known around Camden Street as " Marble Lane "
How do we account the "money box" on the railings,that had a cast iron down pipe connected to it and leading to the basement,
As kid in the 40's I remember me "Da" when he passed the place,(no matter how many times a day) He would put a Penny or a few when ever he could afford.I believe he was repaying the Nuns who were there for something,I heard he was a "boy runner" for the IRA????? and they took him in for some reason...I know my Grand father was shot by the British on Portobello bridge,but lived till 1940,,some connection there perhaps.?
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  #28  
Old 02-04-2012, 10:23 AM
camden camden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommie View Post
How do we account the "money box" on the railings,that had a cast iron down pipe connected to it and leading to the basement,
As kid in the 40's I remember me "Da" when he passed the place,(no matter how many times a day) He would put a Penny or a few when ever he could afford.I believe he was repaying the Nuns who were there for something,I heard he was a "boy runner" for the IRA????? and they took him in for some reason...I know my Grand father was shot by the British on Portobello bridge,but lived till 1940,,some connection there perhaps.?
I lived directly opposite Earleys in Old Camden Street and I was also an Alter

Boy in the convent.That collection box you talk about was fixed to the railings

two houses further down the street going down into a box at the bottom of a

place we called " The Area " The Nuns collected the money from that box there.

The Nuns were very decent to the Alter Boys.We got 2/6 and a prayer book

at Christmas and at Easter 2/6 and an Easter Egg.That was quite a lot back

in The Fifties.2/6= Half a Crown (remember) We always waited for that big coin

and would have been disappointed if it was'nt given.Very Innocent Times Eh !

Last edited by camden; 02-04-2012 at 10:33 AM.
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  #29  
Old 02-04-2012, 10:55 AM
quinner quinner is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camden View Post
This street was called Old Camden Street and not Camden Row.

Camden Row is at the end of Lower Camden Street.The street starts at

Ryan's Pub and goes through to The Long Lane.There's an old graveyard

on this street where a young boy called Tommy Powell was found murdered

in the late fifties.I believe he was from the Cuffe Street area.
we played in the churchyard there in the middle to late fifties...huguenot i think.......

can't remember that murder....have you any more details please
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  #30  
Old 02-04-2012, 11:56 AM
camden camden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quinner View Post
we played in the churchyard there in the middle to late fifties...huguenot i think.......

can't remember that murder....have you any more details please
Just Googled Tommy Powell,I'm sorry but the date was 1961 not late Fifties.

Myself and a couple of friends who played football around that area were

taken to Kevin's Street Police Station and questioned about the incident.

We did'nt even have our parents with us for that.Pretty scary when you're

only 15 years old.They ran Ads in the cinemas like The De-Luxe & The Green

for information but all to no avail.Check out Google and you'll get some info.

It's strange how there was so little information about such a thing.There was

very little in the papers at that time.It was all local gossip and rumours

about who the murderer was.That he must have been a family member etc.

The Google article mentioned he could have been knocked down and then

dumped there.Don't ever remember about that being a possibility at the time.

Check the Google article it's quite interesting re other unsolved murders.

Last edited by camden; 02-04-2012 at 12:00 PM.
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